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 Post subject: For others, it too
PostPosted: Wed Oct 17, 2018 10:53 pm 
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Watching from the visitor’s dugout Authentic Martin Fehervary Jersey , Justin Turner saw his teammates spray Citi Field with a bunch of home runs and figured the Los Angeles Dodgers wouldn’t need any from him.

His power proved to be the difference.

Turner hit the Dodgers’ seventh home run of the game, a go-ahead drive in the 11th inning that led Los Angeles over the New York Mets 8-7 Sunday.

”I was hoping we didn’t need one,” said Turner, who went 1 for 9 in the first two games of the series before getting the day off. ”But it kind of worked out.”

Cody Bellinger and Kike Hernandez each homered twice as the Dodgers beat the Mets for the 12th straight time dating to 2016. Max Muncy and Joc Pederson also connected for Los Angeles. Hernandez and Muncy led off the game with back-to-back shots.

The Dodgers’ team record for home runs in a game is eight, set in 2002 against Milwaukee.

The defending NL champs have gone 25-9 since falling behind 10 games under .500 on May 16, and have won three straight after losing the last two games of a three-game series last week at Wrigley Field against Chicago.

The Dodgers are now 2 1/2 games behind NL West-leading Arizona.

”We had a lot of injuries, a lot of bad luck and nothing was going our way,” Hernandez said. ”Slowly things started to turn around. It was just a matter of time because if you look at our team, even now that we’re doing really good, there’s no reason why we shouldn’t have the record we have now.”

The Mets matched a team record for the most homers allowed in a game, and lost their sixth in a row overall.

Turner, a former Met, homered off Chris Flexen (0-1) with two outs to put the Dodgers up for good. Los Angeles had squandered a 7-4 lead in the eighth when Kevin Plawecki hit a tying, three-run shot.

Daniel Hudson (2-2) picked up the victory with two scoreless innings. He worked around a leadoff walk in the 10th and stranded a runner at second in the 11th.

The Mets lost for the 13th time in 14 games at Citi Field. They previously allowed seven home runs on April 30, 2017, at Washington.

”We just can’t sync up exactly what we’re trying to do every day,” Mets manager Mickey Callaway said. ”If we swing the bats, we give up seven homers. If we pitch and swing the bats good, our defense isn’t quite there.”

The depleted Mets were forced to start longtime reliever Jerry Blevins in place of Jason Vargas, who was placed on the 10-day disabled list Saturday due to a strained right calf.

”I showed up to the ballpark today and they were like, `Hey, how do you feel about starting?”’ Blevins said.

Making his first major league start in 533 appearances, Blevins gave up back-to-back homers by Hernandez and Muncy to begin the game. It was just the second time since 1900 that a pitcher had allowed two straight home runs to begin his first start in the majors, the Elias Sports Bureau said – Don Hendrickson did it in 1945 with the Boston Braves.

TRAINER’S ROOM

Dodgers: RHP Walker Buehler (right rib microfracture) threw in the bullpen before the game. The 23-year-old rookie, who is 4-1 with a 2.63 ERA in nine starts this season, has been on the disabled list since June 12.

Mets: Flexen was recalled from Triple-A Las Vegas, taking Vargas’ spot in the 25-man roster. … OF Brandon Nimmo was removed from the game due to a sore right pinkie. He injured it when he was hit by a pitch in the fifth inning and was replaced by Conforto in the top of the seventh. X-rays were negative but he will undergo an MRI on Monday. ”I’m optimistic because it’s not what I think that a broken bone would feel like,” Nimmo said.

SITTING IT OUT

Mets SS Amed Rosario was held out of the starting lineup as part of a mental break over the next couple of days. His mentor, Jose Reyes, started in his place, Rosario entered to play short in the top of the 11th. The struggling 22-year-old, who’s hitting just .249 with four home runs and 21 RBIs over 71 games, has had a tough time adjusting to major league pitching after hitting .328 with seven homers and 58 RBI at Triple-A Las Vegas before making his big league debut last season on Aug. 1, 2017.

”I’m just having a couple of days for me to relax and enjoy the game,” said Rosario, who has hit only .212 (14 for 66) through 19 games in June.

Callaway and his staff sat down with the youngster to come up with a plan heading into their three-game series with Pittsburgh on Monday.

”We brought him in and talked to him, sat him down and we’re going to make sure that we take these next couple of days to work on some things in his overall game,” Callaway said. ”This young kid is still trying to develop at the major league level and these couple of days will allow him to get some work done in the cage, some work done in the field tomorrow taking groundballs and things like that. So we thought this would be really good for him.”

UP NEXT

Dodgers: RHP Kenta Maeda (4-4, 3.11 ERA) starts the opener of a 10-game homestand with the first of four against the Chicago Cubs.

Mets: RHP Seth Lugo (2-2, 2.85) starts the first game of a three-game set against Pittsburgh. It will be Lugo’s fifth start of the season.

Philadelphia’s first Super Bowl parade provided catharsis Thursday for hundreds of thousands of Eagles fans, deliriously joyful after decades without a title and relishing the national spotlight on a team that few outside the city thought could win it all.

Fans clad in Eagles green jammed the streets from dawn near the stadium to an afternoon rally at the city’s famed ”Rocky” steps, lining up 20 deep in spots to catch a glimpse of the champs. The Eagles rode in open-top double decker buses to the art museum that Sylvester Stallone made famous for a rally nearly 60 years in the making.

Center Jason Kelce gave voice to every frustrated Philly fan with a remarkable, impassioned and profane speech that had him defending the general manager, the coach and a litany of players who supposedly weren’t smart enough, big enough or talented enough to win a championship.

”We were a bunch of underdogs,” shouted Kelce, channeling Rocky himself. ”Bottom line is we wanted it more!”

And so did football-crazed Philly – desperately.

Until Sunday’s 41-33 victory over the favored New England Patriots Authentic Riley Sutter Jersey , the Eagles remained the only team in their division without a Super Bowl title – an ongoing humiliation that gave Philly an inferiority complex and made Eagles fans an easy target for fans of other teams, especially the rival Dallas Cowboys and New York Giants.

”This Super Bowl championship is for you,” Eagles owner Jeffrey Lurie told the vast crowd. ”You are the most passionate and deserving sports fans on the planet. We couldn’t have done it without you.”

Added Super Bowl MVP quarterback Nick Foles: ”We finally did it. We’re Super Bowl champs!”

The parade began at the Eagles’ stadium complex and slowly made its way up Broad Street past the cheering throngs. Carrying the Lombardi Trophy, coach Doug Pederson walked part of the route – allowing fans to touch the gleaming hardware – while Lurie held a sign saying ”THANK YOU FANS” as he stood next to the team’s three quarterbacks: Foles, injured starter Carson Wentz and third-stringer Nate Sudfeld.

Dan Tarvin, 29, was pumped after getting to high-five Pederson and GM Howie Roseman, who was instrumental in putting together a squad expected to compete for championships for years to come.

”They are more than heroes. They’re legends. They’re immortal in this city, forever,” Tarvin said.

Corey Carter, 32, of West Philadelphia, clutched a woodcut of an Eagle that he dubbed the ”Lombirdy Trophy.”

”This is the greatest day!” Carter said. ”Besides God, my kids and my wife, it’s Eagles. That’s all there is. My family and then Eagles, and this is the greatest day of my life, ever.”

Schools, museums, courts, government offices and even the Philadelphia Zoo were shut down so the city could fete an underdog Eagles team that few outside Philadelphia thought had a prayer of beating the mighty Patriots led by superstar quarterback Tom Brady and coach Bill Belichick.

Organizers prepared for as many as 2 million people, though city officials didn’t release a crowd estimate.

Terry Gallen, a fan from Glen Mills, in the Philadelphia suburbs, said he ”broke down like a baby and cried” when the Eagles won the Super Bowl.

”It means everything,” Gallen said. ”We’re loving it.”

At the rally, Lurie, Pederson and a slew of players all took the microphone and dedicated Sunday’s victory to the fans.

But it was the crowd-pleasing Kelce who best channeled the gruff but ultimately good-hearted ”attytood” for which Philadelphians are famous.

Wearing an outlandishly sequined Mummers getup – a nod to Philadelphia’s raucous New Year’s Day parade – Kelce declared that ”no one wanted us. No analyst liked to see us win the Super Bowl. And nobody likes our fans.”

He then led the crowd in a jolly – and filthy – chant set to the tune of ”My Darling Clementine”: ”No one likes us, no one likes us, no one likes us, we don’t care!” The big-bearded lineman uttered at least two profanities that made it onto live TV, recalling Chase Utley’s similarly profane speech at the Phillies’ World Series parade 10 years ago.

Police investigated at least two stabbings on parade day, including one man stabbed inside a mall just off the route. No details about his condition were released. A second man was taken to a hospital with a stab wound, and police said they were trying to piece together what happened. City officials said they wouldn’t have arrest numbers until Friday.

The parade was overwhelmingly peaceful, though, giving fans an emotional release after decades of disappointment.

For lots of fans, the parade was a reminder of the Phillies’ victory lap after a 28-year World Series title drought.

For others, it took on spiritual shades of the pope’s visit in 2015.

”It is like a religion,” said Kevin Fry, 37, of Prospect Park in suburban Philadelphia, a press operator at the Inquirer and Daily News who helped print 700,000 copies of the Super Bowl edition that proclaimed ”At Last!”

And for Natasha Curley, 31, a janitor from Trenton, New Jersey, the Super Bowl title means that rival fans can stop their yapping – at least till next season.

”This stops all the hate,” Curley said. ”They got nothing to say now.”



Associated Press reporter Kristen De Groot in Philadelphia and Michael Rubinkam


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